IPM at A Glance

Indiscriminate and injudicious use of chemical pesticides in agriculture has resulted in several associated adverse effects such as environmental pollution, ecological imbalances, pesticides residues in food, fruits and vegetables, fodder, soil and water, pest resurgence, human and animal health hazards, destruction of bio-control agents, development of resistance in pests etc. Therefore, Govt. of India has adopted Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as cardinal principle and main plank of plant protection in the overall Crop Production Programme since 1985. The detail of which is as under:

Integrated Pest Management
1. Sub-Mission Plant Protection & Plant Quarantine under National Mission on Agricultural Extension and Technology (NMAET)
Scheme STRENGTHENING & MODERNISATION OF PEST MANAGEMENT APPROACH IN INDIA
2. Sub-Scheme/Component PROMOTION OF INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (IPM)
3. Commencement In 1992, 26 Central Integrated Pest Management Centres (CIPMCs) were established by merging all Central Plant Protection Stations (CPPS), Central Surveillance Stations (CSS) and Central Biological Control Stations (CBCS). Later on 5 more CIPMCs were established in 10th Five Year Plan & further 4 nos. in 12th Five Year Plan period. As on date 35 CIPMCs are working in 29 States & 1 UT.
4. Mandate Promotion of IPM in Plant Protection under the overall crop production programme.
5. Objectives
  • Maximise crop production with minimum input costs.
  • Minimise environmental pollution in soil, water and air due to pesticides.
  • Minimise occupational health hazards due to chemical pesticides.
  • Preserve ecosystem and maintain ecological equilibrium.
  • No or less use of chemical pesticides to minimize pesticide residues.
  • To improve farming system.
6. Major Activities
  • Monitoring of pests and diseases for forewarning.
  • Conservation of natural enemies in farmer’s fields.
  • Production and field releases of biocontrol agents.
  • Promotion of eco-friendly IPM inputs like biopesticides/neem based pesticides.
  • Human Resource Development by imparting IPM training to extension officers and farmers through FFSs/SLTPs/Short duration HRD Prorgramme.
  • Popularise IPM technology among farming community.
7. Present Status of Central IPM Centres 35 CIPMCs in 29 States and 1 UT
8. Annual Target (2017-18)
  • Pest Monitoring  9.00 lakhs ha
  • Field releases of biocontrol agents  2200 million
  • Area Coverage  8.50 lakh ha
  • (Augmentation & conservation of biocontrol agents)
  IPM Trainings & Demonstrations (2016-17)
  • Farmers Field Schools (Nos)  17234
  • Agriculture Extension Officers to be Trained (Nos.)  58620
  • Farmers to be trained  517260
9. IPM Achievements (since 1994 to March 2017)
  • Pest Monitoring  273.69 lakh ha
  • Field releases of biocontrol agents  53452.68 million
  • Area Coverage  152.38 lakh ha
  • (Augmentation & conservation of biocontrol agents)
  IPM Trainings conducted (since 1994-2017)
  • Master Trainer’s Training courses (Seasons Long Trainings) conducted on Various Agricultural/Horticultural  crops  71 Nos
  • Master Trainers Trained through SLTs  2840 Nos
  • Farmers’ Field Schools organized by CIPMCs/KVKs/SAUs  17234 Nos
  • Agriculture/Horticulture Extension Officers Trained   58780 Nos
  • Farmers trained through FFSs  5,17,260 Nos
  • Persons (Pesticide dealers, NGOs, lead farmers, private entrepreneurs etc.) trained under Human resource Developments Programmes (2&5 days duration) on IPM skills; 46680
10. IPM Package of Practices:















Posters, Manuals & Farmer’s Field Guides prepared:

IPM Packages have been developed for 87 crops which include Rice, Wheat, Maize, Sorghum, Pearl Millet, Black gram, Green gram, Gram, Rajmah, Pea, Groundnut, Soybean, Rapeseed/Mustard, Sesame, Safflower, Castor, Sunflower, Potato, Onion, Tomato, Cruciferous Vegetables, Leguminous Vegetables, Cucurbitaceious vegetables, Brinjal, Okra, Chillies, Cotton, Sugarcane, Tobacco, Citrus, Pineapple, Sapota, Pomegranate, Grapes, Apple, Mango, Guava, Banana, Litchi, Papaya, Apricot, Peach, Pear, Cherry, Walnut, Ber, Amla, Small Cardamom, Large Cardamom, Black Pepper, Coriander, Cumin, Fennel (Saunf), Ginger, Coconut, Cashew, Arecanut, Oil Palm, Tea, Jack fruit, Spinach, Broccoli, Loquat, Strawberry, Olive, Watermelon, Lablab bean , Garlic, Betelvine. Fig, Phalsa, Saffron, Custard apple, Persimmon, Kiwi, Passion fruit, Raspberry, Clove, Coffee, Curry Leaf, Drumstick, Fenugreek, Horsegram, Lentil, Moth bean, Mint, Redgram, Tapioca, Turmeric. These packages have been revised and uploaded on IPM Package of Practices


  • Manual in Hindi & English on Rice and Cotton for Subject Matter Specialists(SMS)
  • Farmers field guide in Hindi & English on Rice and Cotton.
  • Handbooks on diagnosis and Integrated Pest Management of cotton pests in English, Hindi, Punjabi, Telugu languages.
  • Folders on IPM in Cotton in Hindi, English, Punjabi and Telugu
  • Posters in Hindi & English in Cotton and Rice for recognition of pests and natural enemies.
  • Safe use of Pesticides-Banner prepared.
11. Grants-in-aids to States

To supplement the State efforts, grants-in-aid has been earmarked to the States/UTs for the establishment of Biocontrol Laboratories (SBCLs) @ Rs. 50.00 lakh per laboratory. So far, a sum of Rs. 1882.9625 lakh has already been released to the States for construction of Laboratory building and procurement of equipments and vehicles. All the States except Jammu & Kashmir and Uttaranchal have made considerable progress in the construction work and commissioning of the laboratories. States may consider expeditious commissioning of the SBCLs so that additional infrastructure is created in the States for mass production of bio-control agents.


Further, Grants-in-aid is proposed to be given to NGOs for setting up of State Bio-control Laboratories in the form of subsidy @ Rs, 5.00 lakh per Laboratory for purchase of equipments subject to the conditions given in guidelines. The guidelines have already been circulated to all the States and the same may be brought to the notice of all concerned.

12. Biocontrol Laboratories/ Units in India
  • CIPMCs  35 Nos.
  • ICAR/SAUs/ DBT  49 Nos.
  • State Biocontrol Labs  98 Nos
  • Private Sector Labs  141 Nos.
  • Private Labs covered under Grants-in-Aids of Government of India    38 Nos.
  • Total  361 Nos.
13. External Technical Assistance FAO-EU Project on IPM IN COTTON

Duration:  5 years (2000-2004)
Trainings conducted

External Technical Assistance
  No. trained/produced No. trained/produced No. organized/trained
ToF Facilitators FToF Facilitators FFS Farmers
FAO-EU 5 163 3 105 358 13836
Through States 21 524 7 271 1098 21992
Grand Total 26 687 10 376* 1456 35828**

* of these 25 were women
** this include 5854 female farmers

14. Registered Biopesticides LIST OF REGISTERED BIOPESTICIDES & THEIR FORMULATIONS FOR USE IN THE COUNTRY up to March, 2016 is available on Major uses of Pesticides
15. Consumption of biopesticides/Neem based pesticides in India
Consumption
Year Neem Bt G. Total
1994-95 83 40 123
1995-96 128 47 175
1996-97 186 33 219
1997-98 354 41 395
1998-99 411 71 482
1999-2000 739 135 874
2000-01 551 132 683
2001-02 736 166 902
2002-03 632 143 775
2003-04 824 157 981
2004-05 965 139 1104
2005-06 1717 203 1920
2006-07 1191 - 1191
2007-08 1563 - 1563
2008-09 1235 158 1394
2009-10 1131 131 1262
2010-11 5151
2011-12 5171
2012-13 6679
2013-14 5630
2014-15 5082
2015-16 5635
2016-17 6340
16. Consumption of Chemical Pesticides in India
Consumption
YEAR QUANTITY
MT (Tech. Grade)
1994-95 61,357
1995-96 61,260
1996-97 56,114
1997-98 52,239
1998-99 49,157
1999-00 46,195
2000-01 43,584
2001-02 47,020
2002-03 48,350
2003-04 41,020
2004-05 40,672
2005-06 39,773
2006-07 41,515
2007-08 43,630
2008-09 43,860
2009-10 41,822
2010-11 55,540
2011-12 52,979
2012-13 45,619
2013-14 60,282
2014-15 56,121
2015-16 54,121
2016-17 57,000
Sources: States/UTs Zonal Conferences on inputs.
17. Impact of IPM
  • Crop yield increased from 6.72 – 40.14% in rice and 22.7 – 26.63% in cotton in IPM fields compared to non-IPM fields.
  • Chemical pesticide sprays were reduced to the extent of 50-100% in rice and 29.96 to 50.5% in cotton.
  • Use of biopesticides/neem based pesticides increased from 123 MT during 1994-95 to 63540MT during 2016-17.
  • Over all consumption of chemical pesticide in the country reduced from 75033 MT (Tech. grade) during 1990-91 to 54121 MT (Tech. Grade) during 2015-16.