Introduction

 

The indiscriminate and unilateral use of pesticides was the only plant protection tool during sixties and seventies for sustaining of agricultural production potential of the high yielding varieties under the intensive cropping systems. This has led to several ill-effects like human and animal health hazards, ecological imbalance, development of resistance in the pests to pesticides, pests resurgence and environmental pollution, as well as, destruction of natural enemies (bio-control agents) of pests and increased level of pesticides residues in soil, water, food with the increased use of pesticides.

 

In order to minimize the use of  hazardous chemical pesticides up to as extent as possible & to prevent, manage the insect pests /diseases attack as well as to increase the crop productivity, Government of India, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture & Co-Operation (DAC) has launched a scheme “Strengthening and Modernization of Pest Management Approach in India” since 1991-92 by adopting Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as cardinal principle and main plank of plant protection strategy in overall crop production programme. Under the ambit of IPM programme, the Govt. of India has established 35 Central IPM Centers in 28 States and one UT.

 

Concept of IPM

The Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is an ecological approach which aims at keeping pest below economic thresholds level by employing all available alternate pest control methods and techniques such as cultural, mechanical and biological control with greater emphasis on use of bio-pesticides and pesticides of plant-origin like Neem formulation. The use of chemical pesticides is advised as a last resort when pest crosses economic thresholds level (ETL).

Mandate of Central Integrated Pest Management Centres

 

The mandate of the CIPMC Centres is pest/disease monitoring, production and release of bio-control agents/ bio-pesticides, conservation of bio-control agents and Human Resource Development in IPM by imparting training to Agriculture / Horticulture Extension Officers and farmers at Grass Root Level by organizing Farmers Field Schools (FFSs) in farmers’ fields. Basic aim of FFS is to train the farmers on the latest IPM technology so that they are able to take decision in pest management operation. In FFSs the farmers are also trained about the judicious use of pesticides on their crops so that the crop can be grown with minimum use of pesticides.

Objectives

  • Maximize crop production with minimum input costs;

  • Minimize environmental pollution in soil, water and air due to pesticides;

  • Minimize occupational health hazards due to chemical pesticides;

  • Conserve ecosystem and maintain ecological equilibrium;

  • Judicious use of chemical pesticides for reducing pesticide residues.

 

Activities

The 35 Central Integrated Pest Management Centers (CIPMCs) located in 28 States and one Union Territory undertakes the programme with following activities:

  • Surveillance & Monitoring of insect-pest & diseases.

  • Augmentation and Conservation of Natural enemies.

  • Production and releases of bio-control agents.

  • Human Resources Development (HRD) through Farmers’ Field Schools (FFSs), Season-long training programmes, orientation training programme and refresher courses.

 
 
 

Organizational Setup

Organizational Setup

              LIST OF CENTRAL INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT CENTRES (STATE-WISE)

 

S. No.

States

CIPMC

1.

Andhra Pradesh

Hyderabad

2.

Assam

Guwahati

3.

Andaman & Nicobar

Port Blair

4.

Arunachal Pradesh

Itanagar

5.

Bihar

Patna

6.

Chhattisgarh

Raipur

7.

Goa

Madgaon

8.

Gujarat

Vadodara

9.

Haryana

Faridabad

10

Himachal Pradesh

Solan

11

Jammu & Kashmir

Jammu

12

Srinagar

13

Jharkhand

Ranchi

14

Karnataka

Bangalore

15

Kerala

Ernakulam

16

Madhya Pradesh

Indore

17

Meghalaya

Shillong

18

Maharashtra

Nagpur

19

Nasik

20

Manipur

Imphal

21

Mizoram

Aizwal

22

Nagaland

Dimapur

23

Orissa

Bhubaneshwar

24

Punjab

Jalandhar

25

Rajasthan

Sriganganagar

26

Jaipur

27

Sikkim

Gangtok

28

Tamil Nadu

Trichy

29

Tripura

Agartala

30

Telangana

Vijayawada

31

Uttarakhand

Dehradun

32

Uttar Pradesh

Gorakhpur

33

Lucknow

34

Agra

35

West Bengal

Kolkata

 

Seed Treatment Campaign

Campaign for promoting 100 percent Seed Treatment Practices among Farmers

Concept

The concept of seed treatment involves the use of biological or chemical agents to control or contain primary soil and seed borne infestation of insects and diseases which affects crop productivity and crop production. Presently, 70% requirement of seed is met from the farmers own stock which is used for sowing without seed treatment.

Seed Treatment plays an important role in protecting the seeds and seedlings from seed and soil borne diseases and insect pests affecting crop emergence and its growth.  However, many farmers in the country are either not familiar with the practice or do not follow it.  The practice of seed treatment is also IPM compatible.  The adoption of this practice by the farmers across the country requires effective extension strategies making the appropriate chemical pesticides/bio-pesticides and equipments available to the farmers at their door steps beside making them aware of methods of seed treatment, post treatment handling of seeds and planting materials.  In view of this, Government of India has decided to launch a countrywide campaign for ensuring 100% seed treatment in all important crops during coming kharif season. Pesticide industry associations, ATMAs, CIPMCs, KVKs, farmers clubs, SAUs, NGOs, etc. can play an important role in the campaign for 100 percent seed treatment.

In view of this there is needed to initiate the Seed Treatment Campaign on war footing.  This campaign is expected to ensure that no seeds of major crops be sown without seed treatment by the farmers. Seed distribution/selling agencies should not sell the seeds without treatment.  Campaign coordination and monitoring committees are to be constituted at State/District/Block level by the Commissioners/Directors of the State Agriculture Departments to gear up the efforts by various agencies involved in the programme.  Awareness creation material is required to be prepared and distributed among the farmers by various agencies involved in the programme.

States/UTs are advised to identify the major kharif crops sown in their States, quantity of seed required for each crop and quantity to be treated at farmers level (excluding the seed sold by companies with seed treatment), quantity of chemical pesticides (insecticides & fungicides) and bio-pesticides required and their availability, number of seed dressing equipment required and their availability etc. and plan for the Campaign. The broad seed treatment practices in major crops are given below. This is only an indicative, and each State is expected to modify to suit the local conditions/crops within the recommended practices.

States are also requested to launch the Campaign and ensure promotion of seed treatment practice.  National Kharif Conference, held on 6th -7th March, 2013 has also endorsed this Campaign.

How Seed Treatments are applied?

Seed treatment is a term that describes both products and processes. The usages of specific products and specific techniques can improve the growth environment for the seed, seedlings and young plants. Seed treatment complexity ranges from a basic dressing to coating and pelleting.

(a) Seed Dressing

This is the most common method of seed treatment. The seed is dressed with either a dry formulation or wet treated with a slurry or liquid formulation. Dressings can be applied at both farm and industries. Low cost earthen pots can be used for mixing pesticides with seed or seed can be spread on a polythene sheet and required quantity of chemical can be sprinkled on seed lot and mixed mechanically by the farmers.

(b) Seed Coating

A special binder is used with a formulation to enhance adherence to the seed. Coating requires advanced treatment technology, by the industry.

(c) Seed Pelleting

The most sophisticated Seed Treatment Technology, resulting in changing physical shape of a seed to enhance palatability and handling. Pelleting requires specialized application machinery and techniques and is the most expensive application.

   

Recommendation of seed treatment for major crops

S. No.

Name of Crop

Pest/

Disease

Seed Treatment

Remarks

1

Sugarcane

Root rot, wilt

Carbendazim (0.1%) Trichoderma spp. 4-6 gm/kg. seed

For seed dressing metal seed dresser/earthen pots or polythene bags are used.

2

Maize

Soil & seed borne disease

Trichoderma viride, T.   harzianium 4g/kg seed

-do-

3

Groundnut

Stem rot, Seed rot, Seedling rot

Soil application of caster cake @ 1000 kg/ha or Neem cake. Seed treatment Trichoderma viride @4gm/kg seed.

-do-

White grubs

Chlorpyriphos/ Quinalphos @ 2.5 to 12 ml/kg seed

4

Cotton

Soil & Seed borne diseases,

Acid delenting should be followed before sowing @ one liter commercial H2So4 for 10 kg. seed. Trichoderma spp  4gm/kg seed. Captan 3g/kg seed Carbendazim 2g/kg seed

-do-

Black arm

Streptocycline 0.01% dipping of seeds

-do-

5

Rice

Root rot disease & other insects/pests

Trichoderma 5-10 gm/kg. seed (before transplanting) Chloropyriphos 30gm/10kg seed.

-do-

Root knot nematode

Seed soaking in 0.2% of monocrotophos for 6 hours

-do-

White tip nematode

Seed soaking in 0.2% solution of monocrotophos

-do-

6

Chillies

Anthracnose spp. Pseudomonas spp.

Seed treatment with

-do-

Trichoderma viride 4g/kg, Carbandazim @ 1g/100 gm seed.

Soil borne infection of fungal disease

Trichoderma viride Trichoderma harzianum  @ 2 gm/kg. seed.

-do-

7

Pigeon pea

Wilt, Blight

Trichoderma spp. @ 4 gm/kg. seed

For seed dressing metal seed dresser/earthen pots or polythene bags are used.

8

Pearl Millet (Bazara)

Soil borne disease

Trichoderma harzianum

For seed dressing metal seed dresser/earthen pots or polythene bags are used.

T. viride @ 4 gm/kg seed.

9

Maize

Soil  borne diseases

Trichoderma harzianum T. viride @ 4 gm/kg. seed.

-do-

10

Sesame

Root rot disease, Seedling blight, Cercospora leaf spot, Dry root rot, Alternaria  leaf spot, Bacterial blight, Bacterial leaf spot

1. T. viride @ 4 gm/kg. seed.  2. Seed treatment with Thiaram    2-2.25g/kg, Agrimycin – 100(250 ppm) or Streptocycline suspension 0.05%

-do-

11

Sorghum

Soft borne

Trichoderma harzianum T. viride @ 4 gm/kg. seed.

-do-

12

Pea

Root rot ,                 White rot

Seed treatment with Bacillus subtilis Pseudomonas  fluoresgens Soil application @ 2.5 – 5 kg in 100kg FYM or Carbendazim or Captan 2 gm/kg. seed Trichchoderma harziarum 4 gm/kg seed Thiram+Carbendazim 2gm/kg seed Carbendazim or Captan 2gm/kg seed

-do-

13

Onion

Smut

T. viride @ 2 gm/100gm. seed.  Benlate or Vitavax @ 0.01%

-do-

14

Bhindi

Root knot nematode Collar Rot

Carbosulfan (25 ST) @ 30% (w/w) Trichoderma viride @ 2g/100g seed

-do-

15

Tomato

Soil borne infection  of fungal disease Early blight Damping off

Trichoderma harzianum and T. viride @ 2 gm/100gm seed.

For seed dressing metal seed dresser/earthen pots or polythene bags are used.

16

Coriander

Wilt

Trichoderma viride Trichoderma harzianum  @ 4 gm./kg seed.

-do-

17

Brinjal

Soil borne infection of fungal disease

Trichoderma viride Trichoderma harzianum  @ 2 gm/100gms. seed.

-do-

18

Cucurbits

Soil borne disease

Trichoderma viride @ 2 gm/100gms. seed.

-do-

19

Leguminous Vegetables

Soil borne infection Nematode

Trichoderma viride @ 2 gm/100gms. seed. Carbofuran/Carbosulfan 3% (w/w)

-do-

20

Sunflower

Diseases

Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma harzianum @ 4 gm/kg  seed.

-do-

21

Soybean

Seedling disease

Rhizohium spp. and Phosphate Solublizing Bacteria (PSB) @ 5+5 gm/kg seed

For seed dressing metal seed dresser / earthen pots or polythene bags are used

22

Wheat

Termite

Teat the seed before sowing with any one of the following insecticides. i) Chlorpyriphos @ 4 ml/kg seed or Endosulfan @ 7ml / kg seeds

-do-

23

Sorghum

Soil / Seed  borne  diseases

Seed treatment with Trichoderma viridi , T. harzianum @ 4 g / kg  seeds

-do-

24

Cruciferous  vegetables

Soil / Seed  borne  diseases

Seed treatment with Trichoderma viridi  @ 2 g / 100 g  seeds

-do-

25

Gram

Root knot nematode, Lesion Nematode, Wilt

Seed treatment with Trichoderma viridi , T. harzianum @ 4 g / kg  seeds Combination of Carbendazim with carbosulfan @ 0.2% Carbendazim with Thiram with carbosulfan @ 0.2%

26

Potato

Soil and Tuber borne diseases

Seed treatment with MEMC 3% WS @ 0.25% or boric acid 3% for 20 minutes before storage.

 TOP ^

 
 
 

Pest Surveillance

Area scanned through Rapid Roving Surveys for pests/diseases monitoring

to issue forewarnings for undertaking timely IPM measures.

Plan/Year

Area scanned

(Lakh ha)

VI

25.36

VII

34.30

1990-91

7.60

1991-92

7.70

1992-93

9.33

1993-94

7.86

1994-95

5.56

1995-96

6.65

1996-97

5.77

1997-98

7.15

1998-99

8.30

1999-00

8.46

2000-01

8.59

2001-02

8.41

2002-03

8.72

2003-04

8.48

2004-05

8.99

2005-06

8.36

2006-07

7.73

2007-08

8.18

2008-09

7.89

2009-10

7.63

2010-11

7.71

2011-12

7.95

2012-13

8.33

2013-14

7.65

2014-15

7.56

2015-16

8.82

Total

265.04

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

                                 Crop-wise emerging pest/diseases problems


Crop

State

Pest

Disease

Sugarcane

Maharashtra, Uttarakhand, U.P., Gujarat

Wooly aphids, White Fly

 

U.P., Uttarakhand, Assam

White grubs

 

Up., M.P., Chattisgarh

Pyrilla

 

Tamilnadu

 

Red rot

Almost all the State

Termites

 

Cotton

M.P., Punjab, Maharashtra

Spodoptera litura, Mites

 

Haryana

 

Parawilt

Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan

Whitefly

 

Gujrat

Pink bollworm

 

Punjab, Rajasthan, Haryana, Maharashtra

Leaf curl virus, Mealy bug,

 

Rice

Punjab, Orissa

Grass hopper(GH), Swarming caterpillar, Nematodes

Root rot, Foot rot, Sheath blight

Chhattisgarh

Swarming caterpillar, Army worm, Green Semilooper

 

Assam

Army worm

 

Maharashtra

Army worm, Green semilooper

Sheath  blight

Soyabean

MP., Chhattisgarh, U.P. (Bundelkhand), Rajasthan (Mewar)

Spodoptera litura, Whitefly (WF), Girdle beetle, red hairy caterpillar

Leaf spot

Fodder crop

Maharashtra

Army worm, GH,

 

Papaya

Maharashtra, Punjab, Tamil Nadu,

Mealy bug

 

Bihar

 

Viral disease

Groundnut

Kerala, Karnataka, Gujarat

White grubs

Collar rot

Maize

Sikkim, H.P.

Snails & Slugs, Army worm

 

Sunflower

Karnataka, Punjab, M.P., Haryana

H. armigera

Bud necrosis

Brinjal

All over India

Red spider mite, Fruit & Shoot borer

Little Leaf of brinjal

Cole crops

-do-

DBM, Spodoptera, Semilooper

Alternaria leaf blight

Tomato

T.N., Maharashtra, Karnataka

Tuta absoluta

 

Mustard

Karnataka, H.P., Haryana, U.P., Punjab

Leaf miner, Aphids, Saw fly

Alternaria leaf blight

Pea

-do-

Leaf miner

 

Wheat

Punjab, Haryana, J&K, H.P.

Yellow rust, Termites, Root aphids

Ear cockel

Apple

J&K, H.P.,

Pin- borer, Red mites

 

Coconut

Kerala, Karnataka, Orrisa

Coconut mites, Leaf spot, Black headed caterpillar,

 

Kerala

Rh. Beetle, Red Spider Mites

Root wilt, Leaf rot

Banana

Maharashtra, Tamilnadu, A&N, Gujarat

 

Carpa/ Ciga-Toka Disease

Pomegranate

Maharashtra

Anar butterfly

Oily spot

Summer Pulses(Moong)

Haryana, U.P., Punjab, M.P.

Thrips, Leaf eating Caterpillar, Spodoptera

 

Lentil

Bihar

Cuscuta spp.*

 

Spreading in cultivated fields and waste lands

Karnataka

Ambrosia psiolostachya*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Weed Pest

 

                                                Bio-control Efforts

Parasites/Predators released in farmers’ fields for bio-control of crop insect pests

Plan/Year

No. (Millions)

VI

266

VII

3583

1990-91

1246

1991-92

1571

1992-93

1892

1993-94

1361

1994-95

1464

1995-96

1632

1996-97

1603

1997-98

1803

1998-99

2028

1999-00

2149

2000-01

2099

2001-02

2147

2002-03

2238

2003-04

2326

2004-05

2186

2005-06

2068

2006-07

1642

2007-08

1620

2008-09

1662

2009-10

1607

2010-11

1590

2011-12

1760

2012-13

2025

2013-14

1921

2014-15

1848.72

2015-16

2192

TOTAL

51529.72

 

 TOP ^

 

Farmers Field Schools (FFS)

Year-wise IPM Farmer’s Field School (FFSs) for demonstrations and trainings organized through CIPMCs

Year

FFSs (No.)

AEOs* Trained (No.)

Farmers Trained (No.)

1994-95

944

4335

28151

1995-96

1844

8615

57137

1996-97

1506

6501

40679

1997-98

694

3116

22421

1998-99

714

2581

23295

1999-00

520

1621

15600

2000-01

511

1690

15749

2001-02

520

1802

15990

2002-03

504

1807

15123

2003-04

652

2151

19815

2004-05

674

2847

20357

2005-06

621

2600

18397

2006-07

638

2764

19063

2007-08

698

3264

20940

2008-09

751

3632

22395

2009-10

750

3633

22136

2010-11

734

3595

22000

2011-12

716

1408

21480

2012-13

626

457

18780

2013-14

616

201

18480

2014-15

640

--

19200

2015-16

641

--

19230

G. Total

16514

58620

496418

-                                            * AEOs - Agriculture Extension Officers

 

ACHIVEMENT OF SHORT DURATION HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT IPM TRAINING PROGRAMME FROM 2005-06 TO 2015-16 (February, 2016)

 

Year

No. of 2 days

No. of Farmers Trained including pesticide Dealers.

No. of 5 days

No. of persons Trained (AEOs/SMS/NGOs/ Progressive farmers)

2005-06

72

2880

6

240

2006-07*

-

 

-

 

2007-08

43

1720

6

240

2008-09

79

3160

9

360

2009-10

98

3920

3

120

2010-11

132

5280

8

320

2011-12

47

1880

11

440

2012-13

116

4640

11

440

2013-14

114

4560

13

520

2014-15

115

4600

17

680

2015-16

121

4840

18

720

TOTAL

931

37240

102

4080

 TOP ^

 

Season Long Training Programmes (SLTPs)

State-wise Master Trainers Produced through Season Long Training Programme (SLTPs) since 1994-95 to 2015-16

 

 

Crop-wise number of SLTPs

Crop

Wheat

Rice

Cotton

Veg.

Fruits

Groundnut

Mustard

Pulses

Chilli

Soybean

Sugarcane

Total

        Number of SLTPs

1

17

15

16

5

3

2

2

1

       2

3

69

 

 

State-wise Master Trainers Produced

S. No.

State/UTs

Wheat

Rice

Cotton

Veg.

Fruit

Groundnut

Mustard

Pulses

Chilli

Soybean

Sugarcane

Total

1

Andaman & Nicobar

 

 

2

Andhra Pradesh

 

39

100

22

 

17

17

195

3

Arunachal Pradesh

 

2

 

2

4

Assam

 

25

3

 

28

5

Bihar

 

68

75

40

4

187

6

Delhi

 

1

 

1

7

Goa

 

2

 

2

8

Gujarat

 

3

5

 

40

48

9

Haryana

 

40

52

 

5

97

10

Himachal P.

 

2

 

2

11

Jammu & K.ir

 

3

6

 

2

11

12

Karnataka

 

18

41

50

 

2

1

112

13

Kerala

 

3

1

4

14

Madhya Pradesh

 

9

4

4

 

1

14

80

112

15

Maharashtra

 

10

115

 

4

2

131

16

Manipur

 

2

 

2

17

Meghalaya

 

2

 

2

18

Mizoram

 

 

19

Nagaland

 

8

2

 

10

20

Orissa

 

1

45

 

46

21

Pondicherry

 

2

 

1

3

22

Punjab

40

16

62

6

 

4

128

23

Rajasthan

 

26

40

50

63

179

24

Sikkim

 

1

40

 

41

25

Tamil Nadu

 

30

31

 

37

3

101

26

Tripura

 

1

2

 

3

27

Uttar Pradesh

 

99

1

179

40

28

4

120

471

28

West Bengal

 

133

21

 

154

29.

Jharkhand

 

40

 

40

29

CIPMCs

 

32

39

67

 

2

12

10

5

167

30

Others

 

40

16

3

 

2

4

73

Total

40

591

454

532

120

105

106

93

30

80

120

2311


 

TOP ^

IMPACT/SUCCESS STORIES OF IPM

                              Impact of IPM:

CROP

COST BENEFIT RATIO

NUMBER OF APPLICATION OF PESTICIDES

YIELD

(in Quintal/Ha)

 

Increase in Yield in %

 

IPM

Non IPM

IPM

Non IPM

IPM

Non IPM

 

Cotton

1:2.7

1:2.0

3-5

13-16

3.21 (lint)

3.0 (lint)

7.0

Rice

1:2.2

1:1.8

0-1

5-6

22.0

21.0

7.0

Soy bean

1:2.5

1:1.8

1-2

3-5

12.6

12.0

5.0

Gram

1:3.1

1:2.4

0-1

2-3

8.6

8.2

4.5

Vegetables

1:3.2

1:2.1

2-3

6-8

-

-

-

Wheat

1:1.9

1:1.6

0-2

2-3

27.8

26.2

6.0

Potato

1:2.3

1:2.1

1-2

3-5

199.8

185.0

8.0

Sugarcane

1:2.3

1:1.8

2-3

6-7

795.0

750.0

6.0

PESTS THAT HAVE BEEN CONTROLLED SUCCESSFULLY BY ADOPTING IPM:

Management of Pyrilla pepusilla by its parasitoid Epiricania melanoluca in sugarcane growing areas.

Management of Cotton Mealy bug (Phenacoccus solenopsis) by its parasitoid Arenaceous bombaywala in North India.

Trichoderma spp. are being used as bio-control agent against many seed borne & soil borne plant pathogens. Trichoderma is one of the best known bio-control agent against pathogens.

Nuclear Polyhedrosis Viruses (Ha-NPV & S-NPV) were able to control pests like Helicoverpa armigera & Spodoptera litura in Gram, Cotton, Tomato, Soybean crops.

Management of water hyacinth weed by Neochetina spp.

Management of Parthenium weed by Zygogramma sp.

Egg parasitoid Trichogramma sp. successfully managed many Lepidopteran pests.

Stem gall disease of Coriander was successfully managed through implementation of cultural practices in Rajshthan.

 

At national level, impact of IPM has been observed through the following indicators:-

Ø Crop yield increased from 6.72 to 40.14% in rice and from 22.7 to 26.63% in cotton in IPM fields compared to non-IPM fields.

Ø Chemical pesticide sprays was found to have reduced to the extent of 50 - 100% in rice and 29.96 – 50.5% in cotton.

Ø Net gain in farm income of farmers was found to have increased in the IPM fields as compared to the farmer’s practices.

Ø The consumption of chemical pesticide in the country has reduced from 75,033 MT (Tech. Grade) in 1990-91 to 50,409.26 MT (Technical Grade) in 2015-16.

Ø Crop pests monitoring, conservation and mass multiplication of Biological Control Agents.

Ø Organizing Farmers’ Field Schools for training of farmers & to create human resource in pest management and make them self-decisive in pest control.

Ø Seed treatment taken up as a campaign to check pest menace and reduce subsequent pesticide use.

Ø Awareness campaigns were conducted to involve community to manage rodent pest menace.

Ø Grants-in-aid was provided to States for setting up/strengthening bio-control labs.

                                                         

      

Bio-Control Labs

Numbers of Bio-control Laboratories in India:

 

Sl. No.

Type of Lab

Number of Labs

1.

CIPMCs

35

2.

SBCL (Grant in aid)

38

3.

ICAR

49

4.

SBCL

99

5.

Private

141

 

Total

362

 

State Bio-control Laboratories (SBCLs) in States/UTs established under Grants-in-Aid by Government of India during Xth & XIth Plan

S. No.

State/UTs

Location

1.

Andhra Pradesh

Nidadavola, West Godavari

2.

A & N Islands

Haddo, A&N Admn., Port Blair

3.

Arunachal Pradesh

Naharlagun, Papumpore, Itanagar

4.

Assam

1. Dalgaon, Distt. Darrang

2. R.K. Mission Road, Ulubari, Guwahati–

5.

Bihar

Mithapur, Patna

6.

Chhattisgarh

Raipur

7.

Goa

Farmers’ Training Centre, Ela Farm, Old Goa

8.

Gujarat

1. Gandhinagar 2. Navasari Agril. University, Navasari

9.

Haryana

1. Sirsa 2. Chandigarh

10.

Himachal Pradesh

1.  Holta, Palanpur, Distt. Kangra

2.  Distt. Mandi,

11.

Jammu & Kashmir

Lal Mandi Campus, Srinagar

12.

Jharkhand

Ranchi

13.

Karnataka

Kotnur “D”, Gulbarga

14.

Kerala

1. Mannuthy, Thrissur

2. Thiruvananthapuram

15.

Lakshadweep

Andrott Islands

16.

Maharashtra

1. Aurangabad

2. Nandurbar

17.

Madhya Pradesh

Barkheri Kalan, Bhadbhada, Bhopal

18.

Meghalaya

P.O. Nonglyer, Upper Shillong, East Khasi Hill

19.

Mizoram

Neihbawih, Siphir

20.

Manipur

Mantripukhri, Imphal

21.

Nagaland

Metziphema, Kohima

22.

Orissa

Baramunda, Post Delta Colony, Bhubaneshwar

23.

Pondicherry

KVK Kurumbapett

24.

Punjab

Mansa

25.

Rajasthan

Durgapura, Tonk Road, Jaipur

26.

Sikkim

Tadong, Gangtok

27.

Tamil Nadu

Vinayapuram, Melur Taluk, Madurai

28.

Tripura

Dutta Tilla, Badharghat, P.O. Arundhuti Nagar, Tripura West

29.

Uttar Pradesh

Moradabad

30.

Uttarakhand

1. Haldwani

2. Dhakrani, Dehradun

31.

West Bengal

Netaji Subhash Chandra Road,

Kolkata

 

Total No.of SBCLs

38